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3 events found

Scientific topics: Omics 

  • An Introduction to Data Exploration, Experimental Design, and Biomarker Expression Analysis using JMP Software Tools

    10 October 2019

    Cambridge, United Kingdom

    Elixir node event
    An Introduction to Data Exploration, Experimental Design, and Biomarker Expression Analysis using JMP Software Tools https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/an-introduction-to-data-exploration-experimental-design-and-biomarker-expression-analysis-using-jmp-software-tools Through the use of real world examples and the [JMP, JMP Pro, and JMP Genomics software](https://www.jmp.com/en_us/home.html), we will cover best practices used in both industry and academia today to visually explore data, plan biological experiments, detect differential expression patterns, find signals in next-generation sequencing data and easily discover statistically appropriate biomarker profiles and patterns. The training room is located on the first floor and there is currently no wheelchair or level access available to this level. Please note that if you are not eligible for a University of Cambridge [Raven](http://www.ucs.cam.ac.uk/docs/faq/raven/n5) account you will need to book or register your interest by linking [here](http://bioinfotraining.bio.cam.ac.uk/booking-form/?event-id=3129245&course-title=JMP%20workshop).'' 2019-10-10 12:00:00 UTC 2019-10-10 16:30:00 UTC University of Cambridge Craik-Marshall Building, Cambridge, United Kingdom Craik-Marshall Building Cambridge United Kingdom CB2 3AR Biomarkers Data visualisation Data quality management Omics Genomics Bioinformatics University of Cambridge Bioinformatics Training [] Graduate studentsPostdocs and Staff members from the University of CambridgeInstitutions and other external Institutions or individuals workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • Advances in Computational Biology Conference 2019

    28 - 29 November 2019

    Barcelona, Spain

    Elixir node event
    Advances in Computational Biology Conference 2019 https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/advances-in-computational-biology-conference-2019 The first **Advances in Computational Biology conference – _Fostering collaboration among women scientists_** will bring together researchers working on systems biology, omics technologies, artificial intelligence and high-performance computing with applications to biology from both the public and private sectors. One of the main purposes of the conference is to **visualize and promote the research done by women scientists** and for this reason, all presenters will be women, although the conference is open to everyone. We want to create a space to foster collaborations between scientists, providing an excellent opportunity to share ideas and build research networks. Topics included: - **Learning from Biological Sequences**: population genomics, evolutionary genomics, systems biology, transcriptomics, sequence analysis - **When Computational Biology meets Medicine**: biomedical applications, mutational landscapes, clinical genomics - **Machines Speeding up Research**: high performance computing, machine learning in the life sciences, imaging data analysis, dynamic simulations and algorithm development Key dates: - Open registration: May 6th, 2019 - Abstract submission opens: May 6th, 2019 - **Abstract submission deadline: July 1st, 2019** - Early bird registration deadline: September 15th, 2019 - Registration deadline: November 1st, 2019 - AdvCompBio Conference: November 28th - 29th, 2019 The programme will include poster and oral presentations, as well as keynotes from leading scientists in the computational biology and high-performance computing fields. The keynote speakers of the conference are: **Christine Orengo**, group leader of Orengo Group at University College London, **Natasa Przulj**, group leader of the Life Sciences – Integrative Computational Network Biology at the Barcelona Supercomputing Center and **Marie-Christine Sawley**, director of the Exascale Lab at Intel. The confirmed chairs of the conference are: **Alison Kennedy**, director of the STFC Hartree Centre, **Janet Kelso**, group leader of the Minerva Research Group for Bioinformatics at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, and **Nuria Lopez-Bigas**, leader of the Biomedical Genomics Research Group at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine Barcelona. Furthermore, the participants will have the opportunity to interact personally with female leaders in the fields of IT, academic research and politics that support the conference. The conference is organised by the Bioinfo4Women programme from the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC-CNS) with the collaboration of IMIM-UPF Research Programme on Biomedical Informatics (GRIB), the Spanish National Bioinformatics Institute (INB/ELIXIR-ES) and the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC). It is an affiliate conference of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB). 2019-11-28 09:00:00 UTC 2019-11-29 17:00:00 UTC La Pedrera, 92, Passeig de Gràcia, Barcelona, Spain La Pedrera, 92, Passeig de Gràcia Barcelona Barcelona Spain Imaging Machine learning Computational biology Computer science Biomedical science Sequence analysis Transcriptomics Evolutionary biology Population genomics Omics Systems biology Bioinformatics [] [] ResearchersPhD studentsPostdoctoral studentsComputer scienceComputational biologistsbioinformaticians meetings_and_conferences [] HPCBioinformaticsComputational BiologyArtificial IntelligenceGenomicsTranscriptomicsSystems biologyPopulation GenomicsEvolutinary genomicsSequence Analysisbiomedical applicationsmutational landscapesclinical genomicsImagingdynamic simulationsalgorithmsmachine learning
  • Automated Workflow Composition in the Life Sciences

    9 - 13 March 2020

    Leiden, Netherlands

    Automated Workflow Composition in the Life Sciences https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/automated-workflow-composition-in-the-life-sciences In the age of computational science, researchers in the life sciences – just as in other domains – regularly face the need of composing several individual software tools into pipelines or workflows that perform the specific data analysis processes that they need in their research. For over 20 years now, dedicated scientific workflow management systems have been supporting scientists in this task, and they continue to gain popularity. In fact, recent years have seen significant progress in the functional annotation of bioinformatics software tools, as well as their virtualization, containerization and assembly into workflows for automatically executing the processes. At least since the rise of the Semantic Web in the early 2000s, also the idea of semantics-based automated composition of workflows has been around to simplify the work with scientific workflows further and free life science researchers from having to deal with the technicalities of software composition. This would not only save valuable research time, but also reduce errors, allow benchmarking of data analysis pipelines and enable new scientific findings by discovering workflows that researchers would not have thought of themselves. However, despite its obvious potential and appeal, the need for optimizing data analysis workflows, and despite different research groups working on the topic, automated workflow composition has not yet arrived in the daily practice of life science researchers. The reasons for this are manifold. Some are more practical (for example the lack of automatic composition tools in the commonly used software frameworks), others are of more fundamental nature (such as questions on specification languages, composition algorithms, formal semantics and workflows representations). On one important aspect, namely the semantic annotation of tools on a large scale, the life science community has made significant progress in the last years: The EDAM ontology provides a controlled vocabulary of bioinformatics operations, data types and formats, and the bio.tools registry has become a large collection of bioinformatics tools that are semantically annotated with terms from the EDAM ontology. As demonstrated in a recent Bioinformatics publication (https://academic.oup.com/bioinformatics/article/35/4/656/5060940), this forms a solid basis for performing automated workflow composition in the life sciences domain. Nevertheless, it is still a long way to its use in daily scientific practice. This workshop will bring together researchers and practitioners who have been working on different aspects related to automated workflow composition in the life sciences. These include life science researchers, tool providers, infrastructure developers, ontologists, algorithmics researchers and many more. They do not normally come together as a group at the regular scientific events, so a Lorentz workshop devoted to this topic provides a unique opportunity to join forces and together significantly advance the field. 2020-03-09 09:00:00 UTC 2020-03-13 17:00:00 UTC Jon Ison, Anna-Lena Lamprecht, Magnus Palmblad and Veit Schwämmle Lorentz Center Oort, Leiden, Netherlands Lorentz Center Oort Leiden Netherlands 2333 Omics Workflows Leiden University reinards@lorentzcenter.nl ELIXIRLorentz CenterLUMC software developers, bioinformaticiansbiocurators 50 workshops_and_courses [] []

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