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  • 2nd International Conference on Applied Statistics (ICAS) 2019

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    2nd International Conference on Applied Statistics (ICAS) 2019 https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/2nd-international-conference-on-applied-statistics-icas-2019 The theme of the conference is Emerging Challenges in a Data-Centric World.  Deadline for submission abstracts: October 15 2019 and registration: December 20 2019 Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • Leeds Winter School on Theory and Practice of Optimal Stopping and Free Boundary Problems.

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Leeds Winter School on Theory and Practice of Optimal Stopping and Free Boundary Problems. https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/leeds-winter-school-on-theory-and-practice-of-optimal-stopping-and-free-boundary-problems About the event: This winter school is mainly aimed at PhD students and post-docs but participation is open to anyone with an interest in the subject. The lectures will provide a comprehensive introduction to the theory of optimal stopping for Markov processes, including applications to Dynkin games, with an emphasis on the existing links to the theory of partial differential equations and free boundary problems. Alongside traditional lectures there will also be tutorial classes (4 hours) with a focus on solutions of specific problems. On Wednesday 15th of January there will be a full day workshop on a broad range of topics related to optimal stopping and stochastic control. We strongly encourage attendees of the winter school to submit a contributed talk at the time of their registration. Full information available at the following link:  https://conferences.leeds.ac.uk/osfbp/ Registration is free but compulsory by the 15th of December (see details at https://conferences.leeds.ac.uk/osfbp/registration/ )   Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • RSS South Wales: Centre for Trials Research Showcase

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    RSS South Wales: Centre for Trials Research Showcase https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/rss-south-wales-centre-for-trials-research-showcase About the event: The Centre for Trials Research at Cardiff University is the largest group of academic clinical trials staff in Wales. We tackle the big diseases and health concerns of our time, including growing resistance to antibiotics, early cancer diagnosis and how to eliminate health inequalities. We achieve this by forming strategic partnerships with researchers, both seasoned and new, and building lasting relationships with the public, whose participation is essential for the success of our studies. The Centre for Trials Research is a UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC) registered clinical trials unit. The Centre is home to researchers, trial managers, computer systems experts, data managers, administrators, quality assurance managers and statisticians. https://www.cardiff.ac.uk/centre-for-trials-research This event, hosted by the RSS South Wales Local Group, consists of four talks on a variety of subjects relevant to statisticians, conveying the breadth of different research undertaken within a clinical trials unit like the Centre for Trials Research. There will be an opportunity for networking between and following the talks, and light refreshments will be provided.   Speakers: Dr Rebecca Playle Title: Designing early phase studies for individual patient data (IPD) meta-analysis (MA) Mandy Lau Title: Psychometric testing for validating a cancer symptom recognition measure Dr Charlotte Wilhelm-Benartzi Title: Surrogate Biomarkers and Surrogacy in novel clinical trial designs Professor Adrian Mander Title: Master Protocols and Platform Trials in Type 1 Diabetes I will be describing an IMI-funded initiative called INNODIA which is a large consortium involved in setting up a clinical network capable of running multiple trials within an observational cohort. Newly diagnosed people with type 1 diabetes are recruited into the INNODIA platform and either begin a 2-year follow-up natural history study or become a participant in the available trials. There are a standardised set of repeated measurements over the course of the natural history study and trials. The Master Protocol outlines the standardised elements of the sub-trials. Master protocols are increasingly used to combine several sub-trials into a single document and are efficient when they have been written but are a huge task to construct. The first sub-trial is an adaptive dose-ranging trial trying to look for a treatment effect on a dose that is known to show a difference but also to find a minimally effective low dose. There are seven interim analyses used to predict which dose is the best candidate of the low dose using the repeated measures C-peptide data using a Bayesian model. The second sub-trial is more standard two-arm parallel-groups trial but with the addition of an interim analysis to decide on whether to stop the trial early for futility or consider introducing a combination therapy arm. Several benefits of using platform trials with natural history components will be described alongside the potential issues that need to be resolved to maximise the information in this non-standard platform trial.   (Abstracts available HERE )  Attendance is free and open to all, whether fellows of the RSS or not, but pre-registration is required. Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • RSS Oxford: Judging a book by its cover: How much of REF 'research quality' is really 'journal reputation'?

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    RSS Oxford: Judging a book by its cover: How much of REF 'research quality' is really 'journal reputation'? https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/rss-oxford-judging-a-book-by-its-cover-how-much-of-ref-research-quality-is-really-journal-reputation Join the Oxford local branch of the Royal Statistical Society for this talk aimed at academics and non-academics with an interest in statistics. Professor David Firth will speak about Judging a book by its cover: How much of REF 'research quality' is really 'journal reputation'? Refreshments will be served from 15:30. The talk will begin at 16:00. SPEAKER: Professor David Firth is Professor of Statistics at the University of Warwick. He works on statistical theory, methods and computation, and applications in many disciplines, especially social-science and biostatistical applications. His activities include representing the Royal Statistical Society in the Methodology Advisory Committee of the UK's Government Statistical Service. TALK SUMMARY: The Research Excellence Framework (REF) is a periodic UK-wide assessment of the quality of published research in universities. The most recent REF was in 2014, and the next will be in 2021. The published results of REF2014 include a categorical 'quality profile' for each unit of assessment (typically a university department), reporting what percentage of the unit's REF-submitted research outputs were assessed as being at each of four quality levels (labelled 4*, 3*, 2* and 1*). Also in the public domain are the original submissions made to REF2014, which include — for each unit of assessment — publication details of the REF-submitted research outputs. In this study we address the question: to what extent can a REF quality profile for research outputs be attributed to the journals in which (most of) those outputs were published? The data are the published submissions and results from REF2014. The main statistical challenge comes from the fact that REF quality profiles are available only at the aggregated level of whole units of assessment: the REF panel's assessment of each individual research output is not made public. Our research question is thus an 'ecological inference' problem, which demands special care in model formulation and methodology. The analysis is based on logit models in which journal-specific parameters are regularized via prior 'pseudo-data'. We develop a lack-of-fit measure for the extent to which REF scores appear to depend on publication venues rather than research quality or institution-level differences. Results are presented for several research fields. Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • RSS Edinburgh: The 9 August blackout event

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    RSS Edinburgh: The 9 August blackout event https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/rss-edinburgh-the-9-august-blackout-event About the event: This talk will begin with a summary of the timeline of the 9 August blackout event in Great Britain, and its specific causes – both in terms of the background of adverse weather and what aspects of the system did and did not react as they should have done in the circumstances. It will then use this as a basis to illustrate needs for mathematical science-related research in energy systems reliability, with particular emphasis on modeling common cause events including those related to weather and to the system not operating correctly, and to modeling issues arising from the sheer complexity of the power system and the range of possible (but individually unlikely) events. Speaker: Dr Chris Dent, School of Mathematics, University of Edinburgh Attendance is free and open to all, whether fellows of the RSS or not, but pre-registration is required. Registration link: https://forms.gle/T8H2qV81b4aVEJRb9   Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • RSS Northern Ireland: Capture-recapture for population size estimation based upon zero-truncated count distributions with one-inflation

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    RSS Northern Ireland: Capture-recapture for population size estimation based upon zero-truncated count distributions with one-inflation https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/rss-northern-ireland-capture-recapture-for-population-size-estimation-based-upon-zero-truncated-count-distributions-with-one-inflation Professor Dankmar Boehning - University of Southampton Abstract For zero-truncated count data, as they typically arise in capture-recapture modeling, we consider modeling under one-inflation. This is motivated by police data on drink-driving in Britain which shows high one-inflation. The data, which are used here, are from the years 2011 to 2015 and are based on DR10 endorsements. We show that inference for an arbitrary count density with one-inflation can be equivalently based upon the associated zero-one truncated count density. This simplifies inference considerably including maximum likelihood estimation and likelihood ratio testing. The idea is also applied to estimating the size of a dice snake population in Graz, the number of flare stars in the Pleiades as well as to an avian influenza H5N1 outbreak in Thailand. More information at the following link: http://www.rssni.co.uk/html/programme.html Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • RSS Northern Ireland: Probabilities for rare events (e.g., large explosive volcanic eruptions)

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    RSS Northern Ireland: Probabilities for rare events (e.g., large explosive volcanic eruptions) https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/rss-northern-ireland-probabilities-for-rare-events-e-g-large-explosive-volcanic-eruptions Jonathan Rougier - Independent Consultant Abstract The Exceedance Probability (EP) of a hazard shows the probability of an event exceeding a specified size, in a specified future interval. For example, if Merapi's 1-year EP for erupting 1Gt of mass were 0.001, then there would be a 0.001 probability of Merapi having an eruption exceeding 1Gt of mass in the next year. EP curves are crucial in hazard and risk assessment. Unfortunately, though, there is no reason to think that they are 'smooth'. For example, the eruptive behaviour of a  volcano is full of non-linearities and phase-changes.  How, then, can we map a sparse historical dataset into an EP curve?  And how do we quantify our confidence in such an assessment?  There are no canonical answers to these questions, but I show how probability and statistics can help. Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • RSS Nigeria: Population Data for Informed National Planning

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    RSS Nigeria: Population Data for Informed National Planning https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/rss-nigeria-population-data-for-informed-national-planning Keynote Speakers: Professor BAMIDURO Timothy Adebayo, Department of Statistics, Faculty of Science, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria Professor Kayode Ayinde, Department of Statistics, Federal University of Technology, Akure, Ondo State, Nigeria      About the Conference: The RSS Nigeria Local Group is hosting a 2-day (FREE) International conference for population data producers and users. The main conference theme is ‘Population data for informed national planning and development’  The sub-themes include: population studies, census activities, applications of statistics, business, industry & finance, communicating & teaching statistics, data science, environmental & spatial statistics, medical statistics, methods & theory, official statistics & public policy. The main host is Professor Kolawole Felix Salako (The Vice-Chancellor, Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria).  Professor T. A. Bamiduro’ s talk will be on ‘Population data for informed national planning and development’, while Professor Kayode Ayinde’s lead paper will focus on ‘Statistics, planning, and development’.  Participants will share their research ideas through presentations for further collaboration and networking. This conference will also encourage them to join RSS as a statistical body. The workshop is organised in collaboration with the Department of Statistics, Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta.   The workshop is organised in collaboration with the Department of Statistics, Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria, Nigeria The International Association of Survey Statisticians provided financial support for the conference. To register for this conference please visit: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSc0RwLC91fp9h3ZDXvaGri0IjBXExs-Vj4Y9C8eLHPSweqkcA/viewform For more information about Nigeria local group visit  www.rss.org.uk/nigeria       Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • Basic Statistics: Understanding & Analysing Data

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Basic Statistics: Understanding & Analysing Data https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/basic-statistics-understanding-analysing-data-fcc97ec7-2626-4623-bbb6-5e3a31426639 Ellen Marshall Level - Foundation CPD 12 hours This two day course aims to help delegates understand some basic statistical concepts and develop a strategy for approaching a simple data analysis. Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • RSS West Midlands: Number is not enough - the analytic problem in UK social science

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    RSS West Midlands: Number is not enough - the analytic problem in UK social science https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/rss-west-midlands-number-is-not-enough-the-analytic-problem-in-uk-social-science Speakers: Professor Malcolm Williams - Cardiff University; Dr Philippe Blanchard - University of Warwick Professor Malcolm Williams: With the exception of economics, UK social science has never been primarily quantitative in nature. In the last twenty years this numeric (or statistical) deficit has been the focus of concern. Several projects have investigated this in both research and teaching and learning. An important outcome of has been the Q-Step initiative, with centres established in 16 universities, with the aim of making a ‘step change’ in quantitative methods teaching. Early evidence from the centres is of a positive impact. However, for the ‘step change’ to be sustained and deepened, in UK social science, more statistical and methodological work however innovative, will not be enough.    Myself and colleagues have suggested that the ‘quantitative deficit’ is a symptom of the character of much UK social science (specifically sociology and its associated disciplines). Evidence, over a number of projects, suggests that research and teaching is primarily underpinned by a humanistic culture of critique, rather than a scientific culture of analysis. In arguing this, the intention is not to dismiss or denigrate qualitative research, but rather to point out that if a ‘quantitative culture’ is to be embedded, it must be within a wider cultural context of science.   Dr Philippe Blanchard: I will be speaking from a slightly different background than Malcolm Williams, in terms of disciplines and geography. But I will make use of similar evidence: incomplete, small-scale, yet revealing, empirical studies of students and researchers’ views on their discipline and on methods, and their practices, blended with historical, sociological and epistemological analyses of social scientific disciplines. These elements show that increased exposure to statistics may, and does, under certain circumstances, help reduce animosity within the discipline, yet indeed this is not enough. More structural, undue resistance is at work, rooted in worldviews, power relationships and the sociology of academics. I believe this should be addressed by means of an encompassing reflection on what methods are and what they are for, how diverse they are yet how much they converge, ideas that are too vaguely and superficially defended in existing textbooks and lectures. This reflection needs to get back to the core concepts used to name and teach methods. It should also gain support on recent, major evolutions in the context of quantitative methods teaching. This is necessary if we want sociological statistics to gain ground in the near future within (or at leat with) sociology as a discipline, instead of this happening elsewhere, through weakly theorised social studies that do not build robust knowledge.   Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • Protecting confidentiality and privacy in clinical trial and medical data sets

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Protecting confidentiality and privacy in clinical trial and medical data sets https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/protecting-confidentiality-and-privacy-in-clinical-trial-and-medical-data-sets About the event: We are increasingly living in a data driven world. Data are collected in many different ways for a variety of purposes. As such concerns around protecting the privacy of individuals have increased in recent times. Research into protecting the confidentiality of any data collected is an important and challenging area of research. In particular, there is often a trade-off between protecting confidentiality and preserving the utility in the data. This meeting seeks to explore and address issues of protecting confidentiality and privacy when it comes to collecting clinical trial and medical/health data. The session speakers comprise some of the world leaders and experts in the field bringing together researchers from both academia and the pharmaceutical industry. Session details: Chair: Robin Mitra, Lancaster University 15:30 – 16:00 Speaker: Nicola Stingelin, University of Basel Title: ‘Data confidentiality’: a moribund construction? Abstract: The increase in access to ‘real world’, big data regarding the physical, economic, societal, genomic and environmental ‘determinants’ of health on an individual and population level has many implications for medical research and medical practice in both the private and public sector. Many established aspects of ‘data confidentiality’ need increasingly to be revisited. The presentation will consider the following issues: - Does the classical central distinction made in data ethics analysis and data legislation between personal and non-personal data, with personal data been seen as demanding a higher level of ethics oversight and regulation compared to non-personal data require revision? - Should the ethics focus on individual data rights be revisited in the light of big data being increasingly the starting point from which the personal is derived – with predictive big data becoming also the individual? - The implications for ‘data confidentiality’ coming from the ongoing discussions surrounding what (big) data is, and how it should be classified: as an asset, a resource, a public or common good? Flowing from this, can or should we speak of owning or controlling data; or are concepts such as stewardship appropriate? - Does the social contract with the commercial sector need remodelling? Corporations who drive their R&D processes based on real world data could conceivably and not unreasonably be required to apply new benefit sharing models to their profit (especially during the life of IP)? 16:00 – 16:30 Speaker: Katherine Tucker, Roche Title: Data privacy and secondary use of clinical trial data – challenges and opportunities Abstract: There is a long-standing practice in the pharma industry of re-using clinical trial data to inform scientific research. The aim is to improve our understanding of diseases, medicines and patient populations and ultimately deliver benefit to patients. In fact one could argue it could be unethical not to utilise data to its maximum extent. But with the advent of relatively new data protection laws such as the EU General Data Protection Regulation, how does clinical trial data re-use interplay with data protection requirements? This talk will outline of how data privacy laws relate to clinical trials, the role of anonymization, the challenges and practical implementation and finally how Roche are approaching these issues. In addition, the speaker will talk about work Roche has been conducting with UKAN relating to EMA policy 0070, relating to public access to clinical data (via documents). 16:30 – 17:00  Speaker: Mark Elliot, University of Manchester Title: The revised Anonymisation Decision-making Framework Abstract: The original Anonymisation Decision-making Framework book was published in the middle of 2016. At the time were aware that a review would be needed fairly soon afterwards due to the advent of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). In 2017, an adaptation for Australian law – the De-identification Decision-making Framework (DFF) – was produced, leading to refinements of the basic idea. In all the two publications have been downloaded over 15,000 times and have a large base of users. At the beginning of 2018, we (the UK Anoymisation Network) started the review project, with funding from Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE). This consisted of a series of one-day workshops starting with a legal experts’ workshop followed by a user community workshop and finally an international experts’ group. Following these workshops and various other forms of feedback that we have received, we decided on a more extensive revision of the framework than was originally envisaged. In this talk, I will outline the new framework and discuss the implications of the changes for those handling data. 17:00 – 17:30 Panel discussion   Registration alongside tea and coffee will be open from 3.00 pm       Event Fees: Fellows: Free Non-Fellows: £25 Registration is required. Please register here. Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • RSS Leeds/Bradford: Reaching out with statistics: Experiences with STEM outreach and the AIMS programme

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    RSS Leeds/Bradford: Reaching out with statistics: Experiences with STEM outreach and the AIMS programme https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/rss-leeds-bradford-reaching-out-with-statistics-experiences-with-stem-outreach-and-the-aims-programme About the event: Tea & coffee Chair of the Leeds/Bradford Group Introductions Dr. Laura Bonnett, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool Penguins, playing cards and statistical engagement. Numeracy is a core skill for children and adults. Unfortunately, maths often receives a bad press, especially from school pupils who may say "maths is boring", or "it's too hard"!  As mathematicians and statisticians, we have a duty to inspire the next generation and to engage the public with mathematics and statistics; to encourage enjoyment of the subject, to enhance and enrich study beyond the curriculum, and to encourage unusual ways of communicating our science.  The Royal Statistical Society’s Education & Statistical Literacy Committee remit includes statistical education in practice, promoting careers in statistics, and developing statistical literacy.  In line with these aims the Committee is co-ordinating the development of hands-on statistical activities for its Fellows, and STEM Ambassadors, for use at science festivals and school workshops.  To date eight activities have been launched – how random are you, how to always win, biased sampling, stick or switch, how many penguins, capture recapture, radiotherapy: finding the right dose, and sociable cards.  Four further activities are currently under development.  A selection of these hands-on activities will be demonstrated, enabling attendees to recreate and run these activities for themselves.  Prepare yourselves for penguin poo, dice galore, and audience participation! Jean Rizk, Maths and Statistics Department, University of Limerick <Title TBA> ...: Wrap-up and evening meal Feel free to join the speakers and members of the local-group committee for an informal meal (Venue TBA on the day). Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • Is creativity the secret of great data visualisation?

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Is creativity the secret of great data visualisation? https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/is-creativity-the-secret-of-great-data-visualisation About the event: Data Visualisation is a buzzword and a sought-after skill in business, academia and government. Statisticians (like the speaker) are generally not taught about effective graphical presentation of data, models and predictions, so how are we to acquire confidence in this fascinating but unfamiliar field? I will present some overarching principles and caveats, and then look at the best (perhaps the only) way to become fluent in data visualisation design and coding: creative thinking and practice. The audience will be challenged to come up with quick-fire ideas for various scenarios. Classic or wacky, there is no right or wrong, as the aim is to take a first step into creative thinking for communicating your data visually. Drawing ability is absolutely not necessary! Speaker: Robert Grant Bio: Robert is a trainer, coach and writer on data visualisation, biomedical research and Bayesian methods.He taught statistics and research methods to postgraduate clinical research students at St George's Medical School and Kingston University (2010-2017), and contributed to many health services and biomedical research projects in this time. His freelance clients include Harvard Medical School, The Economist, and the Cabinet Office. He is a fellow of the Royal Statistical Society and served on their statistical computing committee from 2012-16. He worked on clinical audits, analysing hospital quality and safety indicators, at the Royal College of Physicians (1998-2010), then joined and later chaired the NHS England committee overseeing such audit projects. During this time he also contributed project management and statistical advice and analysis to six guidelines published by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). His book, "Data Visualization: charts, maps and interactive graphics," waspublished by CRC Press in 2018. He claims to be working on a second book, roughly described as Cox and Snell for the 21st century.   Places are free, but must be booked here:   Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • RSS Discussion Meeting: ‘Graphical models for extremes’ by Engelke & Hitz

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    RSS Discussion Meeting: ‘Graphical models for extremes’ by Engelke & Hitz https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/rss-discussion-meeting-graphical-models-for-extremes-by-engelke-hitz About the event: Discussion paper at 5 pm Speakers: Sebastian Engelke, University of Geneva, Adrien S. Hitz, University of Oxford and Materialize.X, Enterprise Laboratory, London Conditional independence, graphical models and sparsity are key notions for parsimonious statistical models and for understanding the structural relationships in the data. The theory of multivariate and spatial extremes describes the risk of rare events through asymptotically justified limit models such as max-stable and multivariate Pareto distributions. Statistical modelling in this field has been limited to moderate dimensions so far, partly owing to complicated likelihoods and a lack of understanding of the underlying probabilistic structures. We introduce a general theory of conditional independence for multivariate Pareto distributions that enables the definition of graphical models and sparsity for extremes. A Hammersley–Clifford theorem links this new notion to the factorization of densities of extreme value models on graphs. For the popular class of Hüsler–Reiss distributions we show that, similarly to the Gaussian case, the sparsity pattern of a general extremal graphical model can be read off from suitable inverse covariance matrices. New parametric models can be built in a modular way and statistical inference can be simplified to lower dimensional marginals. We discuss learning of minimum spanning trees and model selection for extremal graph structures, and we illustrate their use with an application to flood risk assessment on the Danube river Preprint discussion papers available here   Wine reception at 7pm      Registration alongside tea and coffee from 4.30 pm. Attendance is free and open to all, whether fellows of the RSS or not, but pre-registration is required.   Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • Future of Economic Statistics

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Future of Economic Statistics https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/future-of-economic-statistics About the event: We will be hosting a talk from Jonathan Athow, Deputy National Statistician and Director General, Economic Statistics at the Office for National Statistics. The talk will focus on the ways in which ONS is attempting to use new data sources and techniques to improve existing statistics and develop new measures. The session will also feature an opportunity for attendees to raise issues associated with the talk.   Registration alongside tea and coffee will be open from 5.00 pm    Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • Introduction to Machine Learning in R

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Introduction to Machine Learning in R https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/introduction-to-machine-learning-in-r-9491a7b0-19df-4ac7-8c5f-40e502272ee1 Tutor - Colin Gillespie / Jamie Owen Level - Professional CPD 12 Hours This two day course covers the fundamentals of machine learning and the methology for applying the to real-world analytics problems. The course outlines the stages involved in a machine learning analysis, and walks through how to perform them using the R programming language and the caret library. Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • Half day meeting on Methods in Integrative Genomics

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Half day meeting on Methods in Integrative Genomics https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/half-day-meeting-on-methods-in-integrative-genomics About the event: Increasingly large scale studies collect multiple different types of biological marker data ('omics' data) on the same set of people, enabling researchers to study different stages of disease in the same person. There is an increasing need for analysis methods capable of dealing with data from multiple platforms and biomarker types, which can account for the complex relations between molecular and other risk factors.  Speakers: Manuela Zucknick (University of Oslo)  Multivariate structured Bayesian variable selection for treatment prediction in pharmacogenomic screens Ernest Diez Benavente (LSHTM) A molecular barcode to inform the geographical origin and transmission dynamics of Plasmodium vivax malaria Ricard Argelaguet (European Bioinformatics Institute) MOFA: a principled framework for the unsupervised integration of multi-omics data Paul Kirk (MRC Biostatistics Unit, Cambridge) TITLE Tbc Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • RSS West Midlands: Data Science at the National Physical Laboratory

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    RSS West Midlands: Data Science at the National Physical Laboratory https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/rss-west-midlands-data-science-at-the-national-physical-laboratory Kavya Jagan - National Physical Laboratory The National Physical Laboratory (NPL) is the UK’s National Measurement Institute (NMI), responsible for developing and maintaining the national primary measurement standards. In essence this means that most measurements of mass made in the UK, from peeking at your bathroom scale to measuring out flour for a recipe, can be traced back to the primary standard of mass maintained at NPL. This is indeed true of the other 6 base SI units as well - second, meter, ampere, mole, candela and kelvin.  However, we don’t just measure, we also process, analyse and advise in a myriad of areas from air quality to cancer treatment. From monitoring air quality to the automation of manufacturing processes, data holds the key to solving some of the world's biggest challenges. The data science department at NPL supports the other science areas and works directly with industry to help analyse and use data with confidence.  In this presentation, I will provide a brief overview of NPL and the data science department. I will also speak about a few recently completed projects:  - Decision making on the degree of severity of myocardial blood flow abnormalities  - Clustering satellite data of ground movement  - Noise monitoring using data from acoustic sensor networks  Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • The future direction of the UK statistical system

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    The future direction of the UK statistical system https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/the-future-direction-of-the-uk-statistical-system About the event: With its current strategy Better Statistics, Better Decisions coming to an end in April, the UK Statistics Authority is considering its ambitions for the next five years and wants to hear from RSS members. RSS President Deborah Ashby will host this specially organised event, and will be joined by Authority Chair, Sir David Norgrove, National Statistician Sir Ian Diamond and Director General for Regulation, Ed Humpherson. We invite you to attend and share your thoughts on how the statistical system should be evolving, collaborating and adapting to meet the challenges of the years ahead.   Places are free, but must be booked here:   Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • Introduction to Python

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Introduction to Python https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/introduction-to-python-8e9cbbe9-8be3-4adb-aadb-fa9711c08b0e Tutor - Rob Mastrodomenico Level - Foundation CPD 12 Hours This course is an introduction to the Python programming language. Participant will build up the skills needed to perform data analysis using Python.   Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • Statistical learning through designed experiments

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Statistical learning through designed experiments https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/statistical-learning-through-designed-experiments Speaker: Professor Dave Woods, Southampton Statistical Sciences Research Institute, University of Southampton Abstract: Statistically designed experiments are the “gold standard” for learning about products, processes, and systems through the collection of data. By deliberately introducing controlled variability, whilst working to minimise uncontrolled variation, we can establish causal relationships, screen for important variables and build predictive models. I will describe how design of experiments and statistical modeling can go beyond the usual factorial design and response surface methodology. In particular, I will present methodology for (i) experiments with dynamic input variables; (ii) design to learn unknown parameters in empirical and first-principle nonlinear models; and (iii) Bayesian nonparametric learning through sequential experimentation. Where possible, methods will be illustrated on relevant examples. Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • Multiple Linear Regression

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Multiple Linear Regression https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/multiple-linear-regression Course presenter(s): Maria Pampaka Short description: This course provides a thorough grounding in the theory and methods of multiple linear regression including model selection, nonlinear relationships, and transformations, dummy variables, interaction terms and assumption testing. The course comprises taught and practical components in about equal proportions, using the STATA software. The course is designed for users of survey data with some experience of data analysis and who are comfortable using statistical software and who want to expand their understanding of more sophisticated techniques. Weblink: https://www.cmi.manchester.ac.uk/study/short/introductory/multiple-linear-regression/ Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • Logistic Regression

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Logistic Regression https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/logistic-regression Course presenter(s): Maria Pampaka Short description: This course examines the fitting of models to predict a binary response variable from a mixture of binary and interval explanatory variables, using STATA software. The approach is illustrated using examples from a social science perspective, including cases where logistic regression models are used as a means of analysing tabular data where one of the dimensions of the table is a two-category outcome variable. You will also learn how to fit a logistic regression model, and how to interpret the results. Weblink: https://www.cmi.manchester.ac.uk/study/short/introductory/logistic-regression/   Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • Introduction to SQL

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Introduction to SQL https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/introduction-to-sql Course presenter(s): Peter Smyth Short description: This ‘Introduction to SQL’ workshop is for any researcher who has a larger amount of data they want to pre-process (store, clean, reduce, summarise), before further analysis. No prior computational experience is required. This hands-on workshop provides an introduction to SQL using MySQL and the MySQL Workbench environment, both freely available.  As well as illustrating how SQL and Relational databases can be used directly, we will also illustrate how to access the data from a programming environment such as Python or R or an application such as Excel. Weblink: https://www.cmi.manchester.ac.uk/study/short/introductory/introduction-to-sql/  Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • Introduction to QGIS

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Introduction to QGIS https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/introduction-to-qgis Course presenter(s): Samuel Langton Short description: This course will introduce attendees to QGIS, an open piece of software used for handling, visualising, exploring and analysing geographic information. Weblink: https://www.cmi.manchester.ac.uk/study/short/introductory/introduction-to-qgis/   Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • Statistics for the Natural Environment

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Statistics for the Natural Environment https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/statistics-for-the-natural-environment Programme: 13:00-13:15        Welcome 13:15-13:45        Dr Hannah Worthington (University of St. Andrews)                            Land, Sea and Air: Hidden Markov Models for Capture-Recapture/Recovery Data 13:45-14:15        Prof Murray Lark (Nottingham University)                            Mapping the concentration of a micronutrient in a staple crop across Amahara region, Ethiopia 14:15-14:45        Break 14:45-15:15        Dr Marnie Low (University of Glasgow)                            Spline-based models for groundwaters contamination monitoring data 15:15-15:45        Prof Andrew Parnell (Maynooth University)                            Bayesian (un-) Mixing Models 15:45-16:30        Discussion and Networking The abstracts are available to download. Attendance is free and open to all, whether fellows of the RSS or not, but pre-registration is required.   Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • RSS Sheffield: Bioinformatics

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    RSS Sheffield: Bioinformatics https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/rss-sheffield-bioinformatics Mark Dunning Bioinformatics Core Director, University of Sheffield Statistical and Data Analysis Challenges in Bioinformatics Bioinformatics is a multi-disciplinary subject that combines aspects of biology, computer science and statistics. Modern experimental techniques are able to generate vast amounts of data that can profile an individual's genome and offer insights into the development of disease and potential novel therapeutics. In this talk, I will describe the challenges faced by Bioinformaticians trying to deal with such data on a daily basis and the opportunities for collaboration with other disciplines to develop new analytical methods. Tim Freeman PhD Student, University of Sheffield Identifying genomic loci susceptible to systematic sequencing bias in clinical whole genomes Accurate next-generation sequencing (NGS) of genetic variants is key to many areas of science and medicine, such as cataloguing population genetic variation and diagnosing genetic diseases. Certain genomic positions can be prone to higher rates of systematic sequencing and alignment bias that limit accuracy, resulting in false positive variant calls. Current standard practices to differentiate between loci that can and cannot be sequenced with high confidence utilise consensus between different sequencing methods as a proxy for sequencing confidence. These practices have significant limitations and alternative methods are required to overcome these. We have developed a novel statistical method based on summarising sequenced reads from whole genome clinical samples and cataloguing them in “Incremental Databases” (IncDBs) that maintain individual confidentiality. Allele statistics were catalogued for each genomic position that consistently showed systematic biases with the corresponding NGS sequencing pipeline. We found systematic biases present at ~1-3% of the human autosomal genome across five patient cohorts. We identified which genomic regions were more or less prone to systematic biases, including large homopolymer flanks (OR=23.29-33.69) and the NIST high confidence genomic regions (OR=0.154-0.191). We confirmed our predictions on a gold-standard reference genome and showed that these systematic biases can lead to suspect variant calls within clinical panels. Our results recommend increased caution to address systematic biases in whole genome sequencing and alignment. This study provides the implementation of a simple statistical approach to enhance quality control of clinically sequenced samples by flagging variants at suspect loci for further analysis or exclusion Sorkatis Kariotis PhD Student, University of Sheffield Cluster analysis of whole-blood gene expression to uncover heterogeneity of Idiopathic Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a difficult to diagnose rare disease that has mostly unknown causes and describes a heterogeneous group of conditions. Its diagnosis can often be delayed by up to 3 years from the first symptom as the disease is defined by a diagnosis of exclusion of other forms of PAH which leads to a heterogeneous population of patients and a difficulty to define IPAH structure. To decipher the features that characterise a health condition or a clinical phenotype, this study selects two robust and consistent spectral clustering models utilizing RNA profiles to discriminate between finer independent sample subgroups. The clustering models extracted five pure IPAH and 4 mixed (IPAH/healthy) groups and the presence of significantly enriched clinical or genetic features was explored Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • Social Media Data Analysis

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Social Media Data Analysis https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/social-media-data-analysis Course presenter(s): Mike Thelwall Short description: This course describes how to use free Windows software Mozdeh to gather tweets and to download comments on YouTube videos. The course will also describe simple and big data-style text analysis methods to gain insights into the meaning of the downloaded texts and to identify patterns within the data. Analysis methods will cover identifying topic, gender, time and sentiment differences in tweets or comments. Weblink: https://www.cmi.manchester.ac.uk/study/short/introductory/social-media-data-analysis/ Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • Consultancy Skills

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Consultancy Skills https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/consultancy-skills-1694165b-5454-4f02-8ccb-e942a4efb0c8 Tutor - Julie Bullen & Roland Caulcutt Level - Foundation CPD 12 Hours This is a highly paerticipative and practical two day training course for statisticians who wish to improve their consultancy skills with non statistical clients.   Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK
  • RSS South Wales: Challenging Statistics in Public Health

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    RSS South Wales: Challenging Statistics in Public Health https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/rss-south-wales-challenging-statistics-in-public-health About the event: Statistics are integral to the strong advances made in Public Health. Many challenges remain in producing relevant population health statistics and interpreting outcomes, in order to improve and progress evidence-based intervention and decision-making. Our event, hosted by the RSS South Wales Local Group, will share knowledge and skills for addressing some of these challenges through talks by experts. Statistics do not make their contributions in isolation and so our event aims to bring together anyone with an interest in public health; including statisticians, data scientists, policymakers, researchers, and health professionals. Following the talks, there will be opportunity for networking, with light refreshments provided. Speakers:  Professor Ann John, Swansea University Medical School - How do my feelings become numbers? Nia Jones, Social Justice Statistician, Welsh Government - Overview of Welsh Index of Multiple Deprivation (WIMD) 2019  Dr Alisha Davies, Head of Research and Evaluation, Public Health Wales - Population health in a digital age    Dr James White, Cardiff University - Is the consumption of alcohol with parents and in the home in adolescence associated with alcohol-related harms in adulthood? Findings from a national birth cohort. Thi event is free and open to all but registration is mandatory: Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] HDRUK

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