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  • Characteristics of Good Data Governance

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Characteristics of Good Data Governance https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/characteristics-of-good-data-governance About the event: Ownership of datasets is at odds with respect for people, and good use of the data, similarly individual control. Data governance is the obvious solution yet obviously lacking in current data sharing activities. However, there are good practices, many of which seem to be specialised to specific settings. This meeting will bring together speakers from quite different areas to expound their view. We expect speakers to identify problems which have led to their view, as well as strengths of their own practices. These views are likely to be challenging and we expect to see some contradictions and remaining unresolved problems. But we also hope to develop consensus on the characteristics of good data governance, and any contrasts with practice. This will lead to consideration of capacity and capability to deliver this, which seems to be acutely short, and therefore an imperative for this to be resolved. Anyone interested in contributing to the agenda of resolving the contemporary challenge of data governance will be very welcome at the meeting will need to form an agenda for the future development of data governance. Chair: Hetan Shah - Royal Statistical Society (policy/ethics overview)   Speakers: Peter Wells (Open Data Institute) - "Data trusts (and other approaches to stewardship)" Catherine Bromley (UK Statistics Authority) - “Building confidence in the handling and use of data” Max Tse (National Audit Office) - "Data and Transformation" Madeleine Murtagh (Newcastle University) - “Developing responsive, collective data governance for health research” Paul Burton (Newcastle University) -  “DataSHIELD: taking the analysis to the data” Wendy Craig (Newcastle University) - "Data Protection Data Ethics" Kieron O'Hara (University of Southampton) - “Data Trusts, Governance and Ethics: A Functional View” Robin Rice (Edinburgh University) - "Providing support and services for researchers in good data governance" Steve Caughey (National Innovation Centre for Data) - "Encouraging Data Sharing: A practical approach"      With the support of:   Attendance is free and open to all, but pre-registration is required     Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • RSS Merseyside - Mental Health Statistics

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    RSS Merseyside - Mental Health Statistics https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/rss-merseyside-mental-health-statistics On the 13th May 2019, the RSS Merseyside Local Group will welcome speakers Professor Richard Emsley (Kings College London), and Dr Anais Rouanet (MRC Biostatistics Unit, Cambridge University) for our event "Mental Health Statistics: Showcasing the analysis of mental health data", which coincides with the UK Mental Health Awareness Week.  The meeting will take place in Room 107, Brodie Tower, University of Liverpool Campus (Building 233, in gridsquare C8 on campus map, https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/files/docs/maps/liverpool-university-campus-map.pdf) 14:00-14:50 Dr Anais Rouanet (MRC Biostatistics Unit, Cambridge University): Clustering methods for the study of cognitive decline and dementia for precision medicine: applications to French and US cohorts. Dementia is one of the major causes of dependency amongst the elderly. No treatments have proved efficient to slow down the progression of this syndrome as they are probably administered too late. Identifying subjects at high risk of dementia is thus essential to start patient management earlier and improve individual health care, in a precision medicine context. Clustering methods are a powerful tool to identify and profile the at-risk population over time. A first application will be based on the North American ADNI cohort, using a nonparametric Bayesian clustering method to identify patterns of cognitive declines, associated with brain imaging profiles. In a risk-stratified approach, a joint latent class model will be considered to analyze simultaneously the time-to-dementia in the French Paquid study, to associate different risks of dementia to each cognitive pattern, giving a more clinical interpretation to the clusters. This method accounts in particular for the interval censoring of dementia diagnosis as well as the competing risk of death. Finally, a dynamic prediction tool will be derived, allowing to compute for a given subject, the probability to develop dementia within the next 5 years, based on cognitive tests. This probability can then be updated at each new marker value collected. These statistical tools are thus promising to refine the stratification of subjects with high risk of dementia and ultimately develop individual dynamic predictive tools for dementia, to improve individual care and/or for recruitment in clinical trials. 14:50-15:10 Tea and Coffee break 15:10-16:00 Professor Richard Emsley (Kings College London): How do mental health interventions work and who do they work for? Well-designed randomised trials should involve examining the intermediate pathways through which the intervention under study affects the outcome. Similarly, in observational studies understanding how exposures impact on later outcomes is of crucial importance. Both of these questions can be answered using an approach called mediation analysis. This talk will discuss some of our new statistical methodology in mediation analysis arising from our research programme in efficacy and mechanisms evaluation. We illustrate these methods with examples from the field of mental health, examining the mediating role of various cognitive processes in the effect of childhood trauma on symptoms of psychosis and the role of sleep in psychological well-being. All are welcome to attend the meeting, however we ask that people register in advance so that we can organise sufficient refreshments.  More information, and registration links can be found at  https://sites.google.com/site/rssmerseyside/research-meetings/mentalhealthstatistics . Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • RSS Sheffield: Uses of R Software

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    RSS Sheffield: Uses of R Software https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/rss-sheffield-uses-of-r-software Putting the R in Reproducible Research - Anna Krystalli (Research Software Engineering, The University of Sheffield) R and its ecosystem of packages offers a wide variety of statistical and graphical techniques and is increasing in popularity as the tool of choice for data analysis in academia. In addition to its powerful analytical features, the R ecosystem provides a large number of tools and conventions to help support more open, robust and reproducible research. This includes tools for managing research projects, building robust analysis workflows, documenting data and code, testing code and disseminating and sharing analyses. In this talk we’ll take a whistle-stop tour of the breadth of available tools, demonstrating the ways R and the Rstudio integrated development environment can be used to underpin more open reproducible research and facilitate best practice. Cloud Computing with R - Alison Parton (Animal and Plant Sciences, The University of Sheffield) R has cemented itself as the language of choice for many a statistician and data scientist, but is often heckled as a sluggish competitor to the likes of Python. This talk will discuss one avenue for maintaining the comfort and power of R (see Anna’s talk!) without having to wait days for your desktop analysis to complete. The foreach package is a set of functions that allow virtually anything that can be expressed as a for-loop as a set of parallel tasks. By registering a parallel backend through the doParallel package, you can speed up the run-time of your work by utilising the full capacity of your machine. Alison will introduce how to rewrite workflows to utilise the foreach approach and show how you can implement a parallel workflow on your own machine with doParallel. For a low-range machine, this will reduce your run-time by 4-fold and for those lucky few with high-range budgets you’ll receive something around 16-fold. So how about going one step further, and increasing to hundreds-fold? We can achieve this by using cloud computing services, taking the load away from your own machine. Cloud computing services have been seen to have a steep learning curve and this has led to many shying away from using such a useful resource. Alison will introduce you to the doAzureParallel package for R, create by Microsoft to bypass this learning curve and allow you to implement the foreach package in parallel in the cloud with only minor amendments to the R code that has been blighting you for months.  R Validation Hub Project - Lyn Taylor (Phastar, PSI AIMS SIG Lead, RSS Local Group chair) To date, the use of R Software in the pharmaceutical industry has been relatively limited to exploratory work and not routinely used in regulatory submissions where SAS® Software is still favoured. One of the difficulties in using R for submissions is being able to provide the regulators with appropriate documentation of testing and validation for the packages used. In June 2018, the R consortium granted funding for a PSI AIMS SIG initiative to create an online ‘R package validation repository’. With representatives from Abbvie, Amgen, Biogen, Eli Lilly, FDA, GSK, J&J, Merck, Merck KGaA, Novartis, PPD, PRA, Pfizer, Roche / Genentech, Syne qua non and the Transcelerate project, the ‘R Validation Hub’ team launched a free to access web site to host validation documentation and metrics for R packages (https://www.pharmar.org/). Although, the project is still in its early stages, it is looking to expand on the website content and encourage contribution of R metrics and tests for packages from all R-users. The talk will discuss what is meant by validation, how R differs to SAS, justify our approach to the validation issue and present the future capabilities of the website and how all R-users are set to benefit from the work. Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • Introduction to R & Statistical Modelling in R

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Introduction to R & Statistical Modelling in R https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/introduction-to-r-statistical-modelling-in-r-42ff19ae-30dc-49f5-95eb-ffa4f5d923d3 Presented by Dr Colin Gillespie / Dr Jamie Owen Level - Foundation CPD 12 hours This two day course focuses on entering, working with and visualising data (Day 1), as well as regression modelling in R, including linear, general logistic and survival models (Day 2). Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • RSS South Wales: New Innovations in Healthcare Analytics

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    RSS South Wales: New Innovations in Healthcare Analytics https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/rss-south-wales-new-innovations-in-healthcare-analytics About the event: The healthcare sector has witnessed largescale technological change in recent years, including in the area of data analysis. The digitalisation of health records has opened the door for the application of advanced analytical techniques, leading to improved decision-making and patient outcomes. However, these innovate approaches have introduced new challenges, particularly around how the methods are implemented in practice and how their outputs are explained to users. This event, hosted by the RSS South Wales Local Group, consists of three talks on a variety of subjects, and brings together speakers from academia, the public sector, and commercial research. There will be an opportunity for networking between and following the talks, and light refreshments will be provided. Speakers:  Professor Alexander Balinsky, Cardiff University School of Mathematics Mathematics of Deep Learning Dr Tracey England, Aneurin Bevan Continuous Improvement (ABCi) Modelling Unit Bringing Statistics into an NHS Setting Professor Phil McEwan, Managing Director of Health Economics & Outcomes Research Ltd. Data Analytics in Health Economics and Outcomes Research   Full Abstracts available here Attendance is free and open to all, whether fellows of the RSS or not, but pre-registration is required.       Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • RSS West Midlands: Modelling genes: the backwards and forwards of mathematical population genetics

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    RSS West Midlands: Modelling genes: the backwards and forwards of mathematical population genetics https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/rss-west-midlands-modelling-genes-the-backwards-and-forwards-of-mathematical-population-genetics Speaker: Alison Etheridge OBE FRS - University of Oxford   About the Event: When Mendelian genetics was rediscovered at the beginning of the 20th Century, it was widely believed to be incompatible with Darwin's theory of natural selection. The mathematical sciences, in the hands of pioneers such as Fisher, Haldane and Wright, played a fundamental role in the reconciliation of the two theories, and the new field of theoretical population genetics was born. But fundamental questions remained (and remain) unresolved. The genetic composition of a population can be changed by natural selection, mutation, mating, and other genetic, ecological and evolutionary mechanisms. How do they interact with one another, and what was their relative importance in shaping the patterns that we see today? Whereas the pioneers of the field could only observe genetic variation indirectly, by looking at traits of individuals in a population, researchers today have direct access to DNA sequences, but making sense of this wealth of data presents a major scientific challenge and mathematical models play a decisive role. In this lecture we'll discuss how to distill our understanding into workable models and then explore the remarkable power of simple mathematical caricatures in interrogating modern genetic data.   Attendance is free and open to all, but pre-registration is required:   Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • Industrial Strength Data Science presents: “We are not unicorns”

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Industrial Strength Data Science presents: “We are not unicorns” https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/industrial-strength-data-science-presents-we-are-not-unicorns About the event: We, data scientists, have been objectified from early days… starting in 2012 when HBR called a data scientist “the sexiest job of 21st century” through to all the tales of business success driven by the buzz of big data. Especially firms who adopted some form of ML driven products started to spread tales about them, the unicorns. People who can come to your business and completely transform it. Has this done damage or favour to the data science industry? We are going to explore this topic in this indeed unique event hosted by Data Science Section of the Royal Statistical Society.  The event is going to be opened by Martin Goodson, the new chair of the section introducing what the section is planning over the next year. Magda Piatkowska (head of data solutions at the BBC) will be joined by renowned industry professionals, who have built teams and educated new generations of the data science professionals. Expect no unicorns, just debate.   This event is free and open to all, members and non-members, but registration is required.   This event will be followed by a drinks reception sponsored by Evolution AI and Mango Solutions                                                     Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • Standing up for Science workshop

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Standing up for Science workshop https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/standing-up-for-science-workshop About the event We are delighted to be running our Standing up for Science workshop for the first time in Norwich this year. Join us to find out how to make your voice heard in public debates about science.  Meet researchers who have engaged with the media or politicians, learn from respected science journalists, find out how researchers can inform policymakers,  get hints and tips from communications experts, and find out how to involve the public in communicating research. Click HERE for application details.  Deadline for applications: 17:00 on Wednesday, 17th April.     Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • Advances in Data Science Conference 2019

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Advances in Data Science Conference 2019 https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/advances-in-data-science-conference-2019 A two-day meeting to present recent developments in data science. This year's meeting is themed around four topics: Health & Wellbeing  AI & Robotics  NLP & Text Mining Security & Privacy Invited speakers include leading data scientists from industry and academia, and there will be the opportunity to submit abstracts for talks and posters. Talks will range from application-focussed to advanced data science methodologies. Invited speakers confirmed so far include:  Danushka Bollegala, University of Liverpool Silvia Chiappa, DeepMind Yiannis Demiris, Imperial College London Sarah Filippi, Imperial College London Bennett Kleinberg, University College London Georgio Metta, IIT Italian Institute of Technology, Genoa, Italy Marion Oswald, University of Winchester Paul Taylor, Lancaster University Catalina Vallejos, University of Edinburgh Byron Wallace, Northeastern University, USA Chris Williams, University of Edinburgh Pierre Zweigenbaum, CNRS, Paris Delegates will be able to submit abstracts for consideration as short talk or poster presentations at the meeting. Note that there will only be a small number of contributions selected for talks due to time constraints. The standard registration fee is £120, with a student registration fee of £80 and a one day registration fee of £60. The cost of the optional workshop dinner on Monday evening is £50. To book your place in the conference please click the link below. Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • Big Data: Tools and Statistical

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Big Data: Tools and Statistical https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/big-data-tools-and-statistical-8a3f28f5-d957-4272-9b02-0b95bd2011cc Presented by Mark Briers Level - Intermediate CPD 12 hours The objective of this two-day course is to train statistically-minded practitioners in the use of common Big Data tools, with an emphasis on the use of advanced statistical methods for analysis. The course will focus on the application of statistical methods in the processing platforms Hadoop and Spark and will highlight how these can be effectively used to analyse data at scale.   Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • RSS South West: Publication bias, and a model for sensitivity analysis

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    RSS South West: Publication bias, and a model for sensitivity analysis https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/rss-south-west-publication-bias-and-a-model-for-sensitivity-analysis Speaker: John Copas, University of Warwick Abstract: Publication bias is a serious problem in the interpretation of reviews of the published literature. We will describe a relatively simple model for sensitivity analysis, based on empirical evidence that research studies giving significant results are more likely to be published. Some applications will be discussed.   Attendance is free and open to all, whether fellows of the RSS or not, but pre-registration is required.   Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • Stochastic processes in finance and beyond

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Stochastic processes in finance and beyond https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/stochastic-processes-in-finance-and-beyond About the Event: This workshop will be part of a 5 days course based on parts of Søren Asmussen forthcoming book ‘Risk and Insurance: A Graduate Text’, co-authored with Mogens Steffensen, University of Copenhagen.    Agenda: 2.00-2.45: Ronnie Loeffen (University of Manchester) - Surplus processes with tax  2.45-3.30: Burak Buke (University of Edinburgh) - Many server queueing systems with random service rates 3.30-4.00: tea/coffee break  4.00-4.45: A. Ganesh (University of Bristol) -  Large deviations for Cox processes and infinite server queues, with a biological application  4.45-5.30: Soren Asmussen (Aarhus University) - Some applications of phase-type distributions to life insurance         Attendance is free and open to all, whether fellows of the RSS or not, but pre-registration is required.     Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • Presenting Data

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Presenting Data https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/presenting-data-d6329a57-5d82-4734-a6b2-69850e4447f6 Presented by Ed Swires-Hennessy Level - Foundation CPD 6 hours This one day course illustrates the basic principles of presenting data in tables, charts, maps and text, equipping participants with the knowledge to disseminate statistical messages in clear, accurate and meaningful ways.     Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • ICQSBEI 2019 - 3rd International Conference on Quantitative, Social, Biomedical & Economic Issues

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    ICQSBEI 2019 - 3rd International Conference on Quantitative, Social, Biomedical & Economic Issues https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/icqsbei-2019-3rd-international-conference-on-quantitative-social-biomedical-economic-issues Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • RSS Lancashire and Cumbria: Workshop on Machine Learning in Astronomy

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    RSS Lancashire and Cumbria: Workshop on Machine Learning in Astronomy https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/rss-lancashire-and-cumbria-workshop-on-machine-learning-in-astronomy About the event: The Royal Statistical Society section on Statistical Computing, and the Lancashire and Cumbria local group, are organising a one-day workshop on Machine Learning in Astronomy. This workshop is focused on the growing area of research in Astrostatistics and the application and Machine Learning techniques to answer scientific questions in Astronomy and Cosmology. In recent decades there has been an enormous increase in the volume and complexity of recorded astronomical data. To answer the many important scientific questions posed by the astronomical community, there is a need to develop efficient and objective scientific tools to exploit multifaceted astronomical datasets and to link these to astrophysical theory. Ongoing work in this area has already led to new statistical methods and machine learning techniques for classifying galaxies, discovering new pulsars and detecting of exoplanets.  This workshop will be held at Lancaster University between 1pm-6pm on 30th May 2019 in the Postgraduate Statistics Centre with presentations from: David van Dyk - Imperial College Chris Arridge - Lancaster University Florent Leclercq - Imperial College London  Ingo Waldmann  - UCL This workshop is a half-day event which aims to bring together academics and students interested in the research challenges that lie at the interface between Astronomy and Data Analysis. There will be a poster session and wine reception sponsored by the RSS local group at the end of the workshop. Attendance at the workshop is free, but registration is required via the following link  https://ti.to/royal-statistical-society-lancashire-and-cumbria/machine-learning-in-astronomy A schedule for the event is given below. Titles and abstracts will follow. Schedule 13:00 - 13:15 - Opening and introductions 13:15 - 14:00 - David van Dyk (Imperial College) 14:00 - 14:45 - Chris Arridge (Lancaster University) 14:45 - 15:15 - Coffee break 15:15 - 16:00 - Florent Leclercq (Imperial College) 16:00 - 16:45 - Ingo Waldmann (UCL) 16:45            - Wrap-up and close  16:45 - 18:00 - Wine reception and poster session The event is free to attend, but attendees must register for in advance:     Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • PSI 2019 Annual Conference: Data Driven Decision Making in Medical Research

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    PSI 2019 Annual Conference: Data Driven Decision Making in Medical Research https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/psi-2019-annual-conference-data-driven-decision-making-in-medical-research The conference will consist of a variety of plenary and parallel sessions, as well as breakout discussion sessions, workshops, a poster session and the Annual General Meeting. Sessions will include early phase innovative trial design, industry best practice - 10 years on, statistical issues in safety drug labelling, model based dose finding designs, an update from Transcelerate and much more, with speakers from industry, academia and regulatory agencies.   Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • Basic Statistics (Understanding and analysing data)

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Basic Statistics (Understanding and analysing data) https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/basic-statistics-understanding-and-analysing-data-51ae9706-bc38-4c2e-a462-f9aab58a3596 Presented by Ellen Marshall Level - Foundation CPD 12 hours This two day course aims to help delegates understand some basic statistical concepts and develop a strategy for approaching a simple data analysis.   Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • Joint RSS Highland Group - St Andrews meeting

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Joint RSS Highland Group - St Andrews meeting https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/joint-rss-highland-group-st-andrews-meeting Abstracts:   Theresa Smith, Bath   Title: A stratified age-period-cohort model for spatial heterogeneity in all-cause mortality   Summary: A common goal in modelling demographic rates is to compare two or more groups. For example comparing mortality rates between men and women or between geographic regions may reveal health inequalities. A popular class of models for all-cause mortality as well as incidence of specific diseases like cancer is the age-period-cohort (APC) model. Extending this model to the multivariate setting is not straightforward, because the univariate APC model suffers from well-known identifiability problems. Often APC models are fit separately for each stratum, and then comparisons are made post hoc. A stratified APC model is introduced to directly assess the sources of heterogeneity in mortality rates using a Bayesian hierarchical model with matrix-normal priors that share information on linear and nonlinear aspects of the APC effects across strata. Computing, model selection, and prior specification are addressed and the model is then applied to all-cause mortality data from the European Union.     Ruwanthi Kolamunnage-Dona   Title: Joint modelling of longitudinal data and event-times with applications in health research   Abstract: Joint modelling of longitudinal data and event-time processes has gained its popularity in last decade as they yield more accurate and precise estimates. However, adopting this framework in health research has been limited. For example, in many clinical trials with longitudinal outcome data, a common situation is where some patients withdraw or dropout from the trial before completing the measurement schedule but the dropout may be non-ignorable. In such cases, the longitudinal outcome data alone may not reflect a genuine change over time, it may be an artefact caused by selective dropout, which could result in a biased comparison between the treatment groups.  In other research, a relatively large number of quantities such as biomarkers are measured over patients’ follow-up over time to fully explore the damage caused by adverse clinical events, and harnessing all such information in a single model could lead to improved estimation and prediction. In this talk, the methodology of joint modelling and its advances for competing risks and multiple longitudinal outcomes will be discussed with real applications in health research.     Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • Getting Engaged Statistically – How Business and Academia Create Knowledge Transfer Partnerships (KTPs)

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Getting Engaged Statistically – How Business and Academia Create Knowledge Transfer Partnerships (KTPs) https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/getting-engaged-statistically-how-business-and-academia-create-knowledge-transfer-partnerships-ktps About the event: Presenter: Gerry O'Hagan (Knowledge Transfer Adviser, Knowledge Transfer Network) “Knowledge Transfer Partnerships: Accelerating Innovation” The Knowledge Transfer Partnership programme has been supporting business led innovation for more than 40 years. The programme aims to stimulate economic growth for the UK economy by facilitating the transfer of knowledge and skills from the research base into organisations to create new value and embed new capabilities. Gerry O'Hagan is a Knowledge Transfer Advisor with the Knowledge Transfer Network focusing primarily on supporting the KTP programme. He has a background in senior executive roles in business and non-executive roles in universities, experience which provides a perspective on the expectations and priorities for the stakeholders in the partnerships.   Presenter: Dan Walker (KTP Associate, Newcastle University) “KTPs: Data Science in a Large Business” ENGIE is a large global company with 160,000 employees in over 70 countries. They are a provider of energy and services focusing on production and supply of energy, facilities management and regeneration. There are large quantities of data available and a desire to become more skilled in the way that the data is used. Knowledge transfer partnerships is a scheme funded by Innovate UK. They are designed to embed technical knowledge into the company through the associate’s work by linking up with experienced academics at the university. This short talk will give a general overview of KTP’s and explain some examples of how a data science KTP has been beneficial to ENGIE. Dan Walker is a data scientist at Newcastle University as part of a knowledge transfer partnership with ENGIE Services UK. He graduated from the same university in 2018 with an MSc in Mathematics and Statistics. In his work, he combines statistical techniques with some machine learning to solve a variety of business problems.   Presenter: Josh Myrans (KTP Associate, University of Exeter) “KTPs: case study -  Automated detection of sewer faults”  Every year water companies in the UK must survey thousands of kilometres of their sewer systems. This enables the effective management and maintenance of the network to avoid costly failures and pollution events. South West Water has entered a KTP with the University of Exeter to develop and deploy computer vision technologies capable of improving the accuracy and efficiency of the CCTV surveying practice. This talk will give an outline of the developed fault detection technology, discussing some of the key machine learning components whilst looking at how exactly the project fits into the KTP structure. Josh Myrans is a Data Scientist at the University of Exeter partnered with the UK water company: South West Water. He graduated from the University of Exeter in 2014 with a BSc in computer Science and Mathematics, before continuing to complete his PhD in Water Informatics Engineering in 2018 (also at Exeter University). Josh has been working within South West Water as a KTP associate since November 2018, where he continues to develop his postgraduate research for practical application within the water industry.   Attendance is free and open to all, but pre-registration is required.   Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • The art of statistics and how to avoid being misled by numbers

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    The art of statistics and how to avoid being misled by numbers https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/the-art-of-statistics-and-how-to-avoid-being-misled-by-numbers Abstract:   Join us for an event marking the recent launches of “The Art of Statistics” by Sir David Spiegelhalter and “Statistical: Ten Easy Ways to Avoid Being Misled By Numbers” by Anthony Reuben.   Sir David and Anthony will be joined by writer, comedian and broadcaster Timandra Harkness for what promised to be a lively discussion surrounding the two new books and the subject of statistics.   Sir David Spiegelhalter is a former President of the Royal Statistical Society and the current Winton Professor for the Public Understanding of Risk at the University of Cambridge. Sir David works to improve the way in which risk and statistical evidence are taught and discussed in society. He gives many presentations to schools and others, advises organisations on risk communication, and is a regular commentator on risk issues. He presented the BBC4 documentaries ‘Tails You Win: The Science of Chance’ and the award-winning ‘Climate Change by Numbers’.   Anthony Reuben was the BBC's first head of statistics and now works on the corporation's Reality Check strand, which he helped to create. Anthony has been a journalist for 24 years and has twice won the RSS award for statistical excellence in journalism. “Statistical" is his first book.   The Art of Statistics   In "The Art of Statistics", David Spiegelhalter guides the reader through the essential principles we need in order to derive knowledge from data. Drawing on real world problems to introduce conceptual issues, he shows us how statistics can help us determine the luckiest passenger on the Titanic, whether serial killer Harold Shipman could have been caught earlier, and if screening for ovarian cancer is beneficial.   “Spiegelhalter’s work serves as a reminder that there are passionate, self-aware statisticians who can argue eloquently that their discipline is needed now more than ever.” Financial Times    Statistical: Ten Easy Ways to Avoid Being Misled By Numbers   How do we distinguish statistical fact from fiction? What can we do to decide whether a number, claim or news story is accurate? Without an understanding of data, we cannot truly understand what is going on in the world around us.   Written by Anthony Reuben, a current RSS fellow, "Statistical" is an accessible and empowering guide to challenging the numbers all around us.   "Refreshingly clear and engaging." Tim Harford   This event will be followed by a Drinks Reception. Tea and coffee alongside registration will be open from 18.15pm   Attendance is free and open to all, whether fellows of the RSS or not, but pre-registration is required   Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • Data for Policy 2019: Digital Trust and Personal Data

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Data for Policy 2019: Digital Trust and Personal Data https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/data-for-policy-2019-digital-trust-and-personal-data Data science technologies, pioneered in the private sector, are now ripe for transforming the public sector. However, both government policy and technology providers need to address two pressing public concerns: DIGITAL TRUST (privacy and security) and PERSONAL DATA (ownership and beneficial exploitation). The impact from ‘smartification’ of public infrastructure and services will be far more significant in comparison to any other sector given the government’s function and importance to every individual and institution. Potential applications range from public engagement through natural text and speech Chatbots, to providing decision support for civil servants via AI-based Robo-advisors, to real-time management of the public infrastructure through the Internet of Things and blockchain, to securing public records using distributed ledgers, and, encoding and codifying laws using smart contracts.  However, in many cases current uses of automated decision-making systems have been shown to cause adverse impacts on important life events of individuals – examples range from bias in recruitment of job-applicants, to credit scoring in loans and insurance, and to sentencing of criminals. Also, state surveillance and manipulation of voter behaviour have become the early examples of how such developments may amplify the asymmetry of power (between citizen and those utilising such technologies) causing severe damage to the democratic processes. The Bitcoin ‘hype’, with its correlating energy usage, has also shown the environmental cost of the highly complex computations, as well as indicating other potential unpredicted and unintended consequences.  On the other hand, the cost of not using – or the slow uptake of – data science technologies in the public sector is also potentially huge, given that all other aspects of our lives are changing fast under the ongoing digital revolution. It then follows that the stakes could be much higher in both the use and the avoidance of these technologies for public decision making and service delivery. This will require a careful cost/benefit analysis before implementation at scale. The fourth conference in the Data for Policy series therefore highlights ‘Digital Trust and Personal Data’ as its main theme. The conference will also welcome contributions in the broader data science for government and policy discussions. In particular, submissions around the value and harm of using data in the public sector, deployment experience in government, ‘digital ethics’ and ‘ethics engineering’ concepts, personal data sharing frameworks and technologies, transparency in machine learning processes, analytics at source, and secure data transaction methodologies are encouraged. Important Dates: Submission Deadline for Extended Abstracts           28 January 2019 Notification of Acceptance                                         4 March 2019 Registration Deadline for Presenters                         8 April 2019 Deadline for Discussion Paper submissions             13 May 2019 Registration Deadline for Public                                31 May 2019 (may close earlier if all places are taken) Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • RSS Reading: Measuring Women Empowerment

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    RSS Reading: Measuring Women Empowerment https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/rss-reading-measuring-women-empowerment Speaker: Geoffrey Darnton CStat, FSS About the event: This discussion is based on and takes forward in a statistical focus the paper “A Practical Approach for Measuring Women’s Empowerment” presented at ICGR 2019[1] (by coincidence, ICGR 2020 will be held at Reading University). Noor Abu Jbara is the principal author of the original paper; this discussion takes forward statistical issues. My approach in this discussion is from a Social Statistics angle, not theoretical statistics, so it should be of interest and understandable to those who do not have a mathematical or statistical background. It is concerned with social relevance and applicability informed by statistical principles and approaches. The discussion starts with brief points about a contemporary serious issue of confusion and muddles over the use of the terms “sex” and “gender”. The key point is that those terms should not be confused and used interchangeably because of differences in levels and scales of measurement. Simple statistical principles help to resolve this muddle. Many examples of a clear distinction are available in legislation and many administrative processes. It is intriguing that many drafters of legislation are not muddled, but many academics are! Schedule 18:00 - Tea/Coffee and refreshments 18:30 - Talk 19:30 - Questions and final remarks Registration Attendance  is free and open to all, but pre-registration is required Please contact us if you have any additional access needs or dietary requirements. Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • Analytics Summit

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Analytics Summit https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/analytics-summit The Annual Analytics Summit brings together speakers and exhibitors from the very cutting edge of analytics to deliver a one-day event that is a one-stop shop for learning about how big data and analytics are shaping the future of organisational decision making. Filled with case studies, new innovations, and strategies on how to turn data to effective decisions the Annual Analytics Summit is an event not to be missed. The aim of this event is to demonstrate, by way of case examples, how developments in analytics are leading to increased competitive advantage. The programme will present case studies in the morning that will be business-relevant and highlight the value creation opportunities of analytics. Afternoon workshops will give delegates the opportunity to find out details about particular techniques or methodologies used. Sign up before 30 April 2019 to benefit from an early bird discount.  Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • Data Visualisation

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Data Visualisation https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/data-visualisation-c8078863-4428-4ab8-917c-f78e7e547888 Presented by Alan Smith Level - Foundation CPD 12 hours This introductory course provides the background context, essential theory and practical guidance needed to develop confidence in using data visualisation effectively.   Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • Standing up for Science workshop

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Standing up for Science workshop https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/standing-up-for-science-workshop-59f2ee4e-edbf-4004-b4b9-5056b8ed266d   Join us to find out how to make your voice heard in public debates about science and evidence. Apply now.  Meet researchers who have engaged with the media, learn from policymakers about why good evidence is important for them and how researchers can help to inform policy. Respected science journalists will talk about how the media works, how to respond and comment, and what journalists expect from scientists and researchers. Get hints and tips from communications experts on how you can start standing up for science, and find out how to involve the public in communicating research. FREE for STEM and social science early-career researchers, trainees and medical professionals. Deadline for applications: 17:00 on Friday, 17th May.   Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • RSS Glasgow: The Storm of the Century! Using data to anticipate extreme climate events

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    RSS Glasgow: The Storm of the Century! Using data to anticipate extreme climate events https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/rss-glasgow-the-storm-of-the-century-using-data-to-anticipate-extreme-climate-events Join us for an interactive talk with the Royal Statistical Society's Guy Lecturer, Dr Lee Fawcett, to explore and anticipate, using data analytics, extreme climate events through activities and using a web-based app. Target age: S4-S6 Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • The Data Book Club - The Art of Statistics with Sir David Spiegelhalter

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    The Data Book Club - The Art of Statistics with Sir David Spiegelhalter https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/the-data-book-club-the-art-of-statistics-with-sir-david-spiegelhalter How many trees are there on the planet? Do busier hospitals have higher survival rates? Who was the luckiest passenger on the Titanic? Could Harold Shipman have been caught sooner? We live in an age of ‘big data’, with more information than ever before. But the sheer quantity of data can make it even more difficult to draw reliable conclusions from the numbers. In our latest Data Book Club event, we'll be hearing from Sir David Spiegelhalter about his book The Art of Statistics. The book guides us through the essential principles we need in order to derive knowledge from data, showing us why data can never speak for itself. Our new faith in big data is so often misplaced, he argues, and without the intervention of human creativity and questioning, data remains mute and our statistics flawed. Drawing on real world examples from current science and the media, his own career and the distance past, Spiegelhalter shows us how statistics can help us determine the signal from the noise. Sir David Spiegelhalter is a British statistician and Chair of the Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication in the Statistical Laboratory at the University of Cambridge. Spiegelhalter is one of the most cited and influential researchers in his field, and was elected as President of the Royal Statistical Society for 2017-18. As a statistician he was called to give evidence at the public inquiry into Dr Harold Shipman, which concluded the extent of his victims. Ticket includes chance to hear Sir David talk about the book as well as a copy of 'The Art of Statistics'. Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • ESWG seminar: Exploring Regional Statistics

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    ESWG seminar: Exploring Regional Statistics https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/eswg-seminar-exploring-regional-statistics The Economic Statistics Working Group (ESWG) is hosting a free afternoon seminar focusing on regional statistics. This session gives the opportunity to hear from users of data at a regional level, Chaired by Dev Virdee, the keynote speakers will be Richard Kneller (Nottingham University) and Sandy Stewart (Scottish Government) with further speakers to be confirmed. This event follows a morning session from the ONS Economic Forum who will present an update on the UK economy and present analysis on statistics at a regional level. This will also include an opportunity to hear about exciting developments with transformation of local area statistics being undertaken by ONS. Delegates are invited to one or both sessions. Lunch and refreshments will be provided. Please register at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/exploring-regional-statistics-edinburgh-tickets-61990736963   Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • Challenges and Opportunities of Data and Statistical Methods in Heath Research and Practice

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    Challenges and Opportunities of Data and Statistical Methods in Heath Research and Practice https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/challenges-and-opportunities-of-data-and-statistical-methods-in-heath-research-and-practice This event is being held in honour of Professor Doug Altman and will be chaired by Martin Bland Speakers: Toby Prevost: “Analysis of serial measurements in medical research and in clinical trials” Abstract: In an article published in the BMJ in 1990 (now cited >2400 times), Matthews, Altman and colleagues considered the analysis of serial measurements in medical research and recommended a two-stage approach based on summary measures. In this talk, I will describe the major themes in the article and their application to the design of a clinical trial. Briefly, parallels will be drawn between the role of summary measures in trials of individual and cluster randomised designs, and between analysis by summary measures and by mixed models. Reference: Matthews JN, Altman DG, Campbell MJ, Royston P. Analysis of serial measurements in medical research. BMJ 1990;300:230-5 Mark Ashworth: “Some Problems with Primary Care Data” Abstract: Primary care is a rich source of statistical data. It is also a source of considerable problems for the purposes of statistical analyses. I will give examples of where ‘big data’ from primary care may produce misleading data outputs.  I will discuss three national sources of primary care data, CPRD, THIN and data from the Royal College of General Practitioners’ monitoring practices, comparing their data formats and their use as assets for data analyses. I will contrast this with locally available patient-level data such as Lambeth DataNet. Numeric estimates may improve communication and risk perception in general practice. We get different perspectives when risk perception is based on NNT, Absolute Risk, or the still predominant use of Relative Risk, in making clinical decisions. We also need to exercise caution in basing health service decisions on univariable rather than multivariate data in primary care. I will give examples of where decisions have been made using misleading data. Finally, I will be looking at the use of primary care data analyses from the perspective of patient care in primary care. GPs use data for the communication of risk, balancing evidence-based medicine with patient preference, and I will give examples applying this to breast cancer, prostate cancer and CVD risk. I will then use these arguments to pose the question of why rational patients may reject statistically based advice? Camila Caiado: “Developing Planning Tools for GP Practices: Using Population and Health Care Records” Abstract: We are constructing models and apps that provide health providers and local authorities with powerful tools for better decision making and planning. An app has been developed with GP practices for predicting patient flows and behaviour and help health providers to understand and prepare for both current and future demands. The app also allows managers and clinical teams to see projections of GP practice activity with different population growth scenarios. Gary Collins: “ISSUES on Prognosis and Prediction in Medical Research” Abstract: Decisions are routinely made by healthcare professionals on the basis of an estimated probability for diagnosis and prognosis. Models which combine multiple predictors are used as a basis for estimating this probability. A number of models are now embedded in general practice software, such as the QRISK model for predicting the 10-year risk of developing cardiovascular disease.  Traditionally, prediction models have been developed using regression based approaches such as logistic or Cox regression depending on the outcome being predicted. More recently, there has been a surge in interest in using modern approaches under the umbrella term of machine learning. The interest and uptake in machine learning is often accompanied with enthusiastic claims that they can provide superior predictive accuracy over traditional approaches, however recent systematic reviews have highlighted various shortcomings in the design, conduct and reporting of these comparative studies.   In this talk I will discuss, with examples, some of the challenges in developing and validating prediction models using both traditional and machine learning approaches.  I will also critically highlight some of the more common methodological, terminology and reporting issues encountered in prediction models studies.   Attendance is free and open to all, but pre-registration is required. Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
  • RSS West Midlands: Anthropomorphic Learning

    No date given

    London, United Kingdom

    RSS West Midlands: Anthropomorphic Learning https://tess.elixir-europe.org/events/rss-west-midlands-anthropomorphic-learning Speaker: Ganna Pogrebna (University of Birmingham) Understanding and modelling human behaviour is one of the major tasks facing industry and academia of the future. This task is especially important when we consider interactions between humans and technology. Decision support systems, suggestion systems, automation, etc. – all these technologically intense aspects of human life require accurate predictions of what people like, what people prefer, and where people need help of automated agents. Under these circumstances, recent advances in computer science, statistics, and mathematics offer several methods which try to model human behaviour. Specifically, the methodology of machine learning and, more recently, deep learning allows us to generate predictions useful for many different facets of human life. Yet, there are many aspects of human life and decision making where machine learning and deep learning fail to provide reliable and accurate results. One of the most notorious examples is suggestion systems: many of us regularly shop online using different platforms (such as Amazon) and receive suggestions for future purchases. Yet, very few of us find these suggestions helpful. One of the reasons why AI fails in many cases to correctly anticipate human behaviour is that AI algorithms tend to ignore existing insights from decision theory and behavioural science. By combining behavioural science models with AI algorithms, we are able to significantly improve and simplify predictions of human behaviour in a wide variety of contexts. The resulting methodology which we label anthropomorphic learning allows us to develop more functional systems which better understand humans. This methodology is explainable, traceable, requires smaller training sets and, generally, outperforms existing algorithms by generating more accurate predictions. About the speaker: Ganna is a Professor of Behavioral Economics and Data Science at the University of Birmingham and a Fellow at the Alan Turing Institute. She is also a Turing Lead for the University of Birmingham and a Behavioral Data Science Lead at the Alan Turing Institute. Blending behavioral science, computer science, data analytics, engineering, and business model innovation, Ganna helps businesses, charities, cities, and individuals to better understand why they make decisions they make and how they can optimize their behavior to achieve higher profit, better (cyber)security, more desirable social outcomes, as well as flourish and bolster their well-being. Royal Statistical Society The Royal Statistical Society, London, United Kingdom The Royal Statistical Society London United Kingdom EC1Y 8LX [] [] [] workshops_and_courses [] []
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